asteroidmind:

Photographer Shannon Bileski of Signature Exposures captured this beautiful photograph last Friday at Patricia Beach in Canada. It shows a bright meteor streaking through a sky filled with the green glow of the aurora borealis. Bileski tells us she was out at the beach attempting to witness and photograph the northern lights with others from a photography club and an astronomy club.
The aurora was on and off all night, but at 11:10pm just as everyone else was packing up their camera gear, the green glow in the sky intensified. Bileski began snapping some shots with her Nikon D800 and Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, with settings at f/3.2, 8s, and ISO 800.
Suddenly, during one of the 8-second exposures, there was an intense streak of light in the sky and bright green flashes. It was a meteor that had broken up in the atmosphere, and Bileski captured the whole event as the photo above.
To see such a bright meteor is a rare occurrence already, but to capture one on camera whizzing toward Earth through the northern lights? “Amazing,” Bileski says.

asteroidmind:

Photographer Shannon Bileski of Signature Exposures captured this beautiful photograph last Friday at Patricia Beach in Canada. It shows a bright meteor streaking through a sky filled with the green glow of the aurora borealis.

Bileski tells us she was out at the beach attempting to witness and photograph the northern lights with others from a photography club and an astronomy club.

The aurora was on and off all night, but at 11:10pm just as everyone else was packing up their camera gear, the green glow in the sky intensified. Bileski began snapping some shots with her Nikon D800 and Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, with settings at f/3.2, 8s, and ISO 800.

Suddenly, during one of the 8-second exposures, there was an intense streak of light in the sky and bright green flashes. It was a meteor that had broken up in the atmosphere, and Bileski captured the whole event as the photo above.

To see such a bright meteor is a rare occurrence already, but to capture one on camera whizzing toward Earth through the northern lights? “Amazing,” Bileski says.

ikenbot:

Auroras over Arctic Henge
by Stephane Vetter
Auroras in Arctic Henge, the Icelandic Stonehenge near Raufarhöfn.

ikenbot:

Auroras over Arctic Henge

by Stephane Vetter

Auroras in Arctic Henge, the Icelandic Stonehenge near Raufarhöfn.

abluegirl:

Plasma Jam - the first ever video from inside the Northern Lights:

This timelapse video contains the first-ever photos from alongside the edge of the Northern Lights, aka. the Aurora Borealis.

Captured at 100,000 feet using a modified GoPro HD Hero2 camera attached to a carbon fiber frame, this homemade spacecraft reached altitude using a helium weather balloon and also hosted other scientific instruments used to measure features of the Aurora.

According to the project leader, Ben Longmier, “We were measuring the plasma particle density at an altitude of 30 km, where the particle density is enhanced due to the presence of the aurora and high energy electrons streaming down into the magnetosphere.”

[Note: it also may feature the first-ever footage of the Northern Lights scored without the use of classical music. We’re breaking all kinds of firsts, here.]